Posts Tagged ‘ Tobot ’

Turning Mecard scheduled for Teletoon run

Various online schedules (including the channel’s own) are indicating Teletoon will premiere the South Korean-Japanese animated series Turning Mecard on May 28, 2017. Its first episode, “A Mysterious New Kid,” is set for 2PM, with episode 2, “A Guest From Another World,” listed for the following Sunday at the same time. Zap2it and TVPassport also have an encore run on Cartoon Network Canada set to begin on June 4th at 9:30AM.

While I just called Turning Mecard a South Korean-Japanese production, it’s a little more complicated than that. All of the business partners involved appear to be Korean. Heewon Entertainment provides the animation. KBS is the lead broadcast partner. Choirock designs the toys and Sono Kong distributes them. It’s some of the show’s creative staff that hail from Japan. Most notably, Atsushi Maekawa, who wrote for Bakugan, Digimon, Dragon Ball, Sailor Moon and a whole lot more, is Mecard’s lead writer and is also credited as the creator of the franchise. Other Japanese crew include a bunch of Bakugan’s other writers, as well as Yasuo Kageyama and Takaaki Ishiyama, the latter of whom served as one of the directors on Spider Riders. Continue reading

CRTC approves Gintama, World Trigger, more as Canadian content; DHX set to co-produce new Mega Man cartoon

My actual reaction to what you're going to read below.

My actual reaction to what you’re going to read below.

Long time readers of the blog should be aware of the concept of Cancon quotas – a mandate by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) that requires all Canadian television broadcasters to devote a certain percentage of their schedule to locally produced content. It’s a protectionist measure meant to encourage industry and prevent Canada from just being the US, but colder. The quotas have almost certainly benefited the Canadian anime fandom, as simply recording a show’s audio track in Canada qualifies the production as partial Cancon. This gives anime a leg up on other foreign shows. Due to a number of factors, Canadian anime dubs are far less common than they once were. But things might be starting to look up.

To keep broadcasters honest, the CRTC requires programs wishing to count as Canadian content to be sent for approval. As a result of that, the CRTC keeps a publicly accessible database of content that is certified Canadian. This year has seen some interesting anime additions that haven’t aired on Canadian TV. Continue reading