Posts Tagged ‘ Theatres ’

Canadian Theatrical News: Maquia – When the Promised Flower Blooms

Eleven Arts have partnered up with Cineplex to bring Mari Okada and P.A. Works’ original film Maquia – When the Promised Flower Blooms to theatres in Canada this July. The movie opened in Japan on February 28th of this year with U.S. screenings also taking place in July. Continue reading

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Canadian Theatrical News: Haikara-San: Here Comes Miss Modern – Part 1

Eleven Arts are teaming up with Cineplex to release the first of two Haikara-San: Here Comes Miss Modern films in Canada this June. Adapted by Nippon Animation from Waki Yamato’s 1975-1977 manga series Here Comes Miss Modern, the first film opened in Japan last November, with the second set for sometime this year. The Canadian release is timed to coincide with its launch in the United States. Continue reading

Canadian Theatrical News: Love Live! Sunshine!! Hakodate Unit Carnival

Now a trilogy of events, Azoland Pictures and Cineplex have teamed up to bring Saint Snow presents Love Live! Sunshine!! Hakodate Unit Carnival to cinemas in Canada on May 20th. The screening is a four hour, unsubbed presentation of a broadcast from the April 28th concert performance at Hakodate Arena in Hakodate, Japan. Continue reading

Canadian Theatrical News: Love Live! Sunshine!! Aqours 2nd Love Live! Happy Party Train Tour

Following the March release of Aqours’ first concert, Azoland Pictures and Cineplex have teamed up to bring Aqours 2nd Love Live! Happy Party Train Tour to cinemas in Canada on October 21st. The screening is a four hour, unsubbed presentation of a broadcast from the September 30th performance at Metlife Dome in Saitama, Japan. Continue reading

Canadian Theatrical News: Tokyo Ghoul

Funimation is bringing the Japanese live action adaptation of Sui Ishida’s horror manga Tokyo Ghoul to cinemas in Canada and the United States just in time for the Halloween season. Funimation has previously released the two anime adaptations based on the series. The film, directed by Kentaro Hagiwara, stars Masataka Kubota and Fumika Shimizu as Ken Kaneki and Tōuka Kirishima, respectively. It opened in Japanese theatres on July 29th.
Continue reading

Canadian Theatrical News: Napping Princess

GKIDS is bringing Kenji Kamiyama and SIGNAL.MD’s (a Production I.G. sister company) Napping Princess to select art house cinemas in North America this month. The film opened in Japan in March and received a Hulu Japan-only spinoff short, Ancien and the Magic Tablet ~Another Napping Princess~. Yen Press has been releasing Hana Ichika’s manga adaptation in English simultaneously with Japan.

A veteran of Production I.G., Kamiyama not only directed the wholly original feature film, he also wrote its script. Eden of the East’s Satoko Morikawa designed the characters, while Heroman’s Shigeto Koyama handled the mechanical work. Final Fantasy and Kingdom Hearts regular Yoko Shimomura is behind the film’s score. Continue reading

Canadian Theatrical News: Shin Godzilla, Miss Hokusai, Yo-Kai Watch: The Movie

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This mega Canadian silver screen update has got kaiju, something you might confuse for one of Ghibli’s more obscure films, Ghibli itself and an overdue horror screening. However, before we dive into any of those, I’ve got some Yo-Kai to attend to.

In one of the blog’s recent posts, I offhandedly mentioned that Yo-Kai Watch: The Movie would be screened in Canada. We’re now days away from the film’s October 15th US premiere and we’re still kind of left in the dark as to what will happen. Cineplex, the go to for Canadian Eleven Arts event screenings, posted a page for the film with a release date on the same day as the US, but never offered ticket reservations. That page has since been deleted. While that might seem alarming, I spoke to a representative from Eleven Arts last week who confirmed the film will be released in Canada. Unfortunately, they didn’t give me any more info than that. I can only speculate as to what’s going on (Teletoon’s run of season 2 is coming a little late, maybe there’s some narrative hooks that setup the film that the Canadian run hasn’t gotten to yet?), so I’ll just say Yo-Kai is why? Continue reading

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