Posts Tagged ‘ DHX Media ’

Beyblade Burst Turbo premieres double; DHX cuts slate, sells studio

Teletoon is doubling up on Beyblade Burst Turbo premieres. Starting tomorrow with episode 6 “Winter Knight! Battle Royale!”, the channel will begin airing a new episode on both Saturdays and Sundays at 2PM ET. Premieres had previously been limited to the Sunday slot.

The English dub of Beyblade Burst Turbo debuted on the channel on October 7th. It is the first mainline show in the franchise not dubbed in Canada, as series distributor Sunrights shifted production to Burbank’s Bang Zoom Entertainment. The prior two seasons were dubbed in western Canada by Ocean Productions.

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Mega Man: Fully Charged set for September on Family CHRGD

TV Passport is listing the Canadian premiere of Mega Man: Fully Charged on Family CHRGD for Saturday, September 8th at 8:30 AM, with an encore airing set for 12:40 PM. An additional new episode will also air on Sunday in the same time slots. Both are half-hour. Continue reading

Mega Man: Fully Charged gets launch details, Buddyfight Ace dub debuts

Dentsu Entertainment and DHX Media have announced that Mega Man: Fully Charged will launch in the United States next month. The series is set to begin airing on Cartoon Network starting Sunday, August 5th. Ten episodes will also be available on the Cartoon Network app and various TV providers’ VOD and on-demand streaming platforms in the US commencing Friday, August 3rd. As for us Canadians? DHX says it’ll air on Family Channel (no longer first on CHRGD?) in the fall.

Here’s the show’s description: Continue reading

Odds & Ends: Corus at Anime North, Teletoon tosses Turning Mecard, Dragon Ball Tour in Toronto

odds and ends 5 18Breakdown

YTV and Nelvana attend Anime North 2018 (Updated 5/23/2018)
Dragon Ball Tour stops in Toronto (Updated 5/21/2018)
Teletoon pulls Turning Mecard off the schedule
Teletoon promotes “1000th” episode of Pokémon
DHX sells share of Peanuts to Sony Music Entertainment
Super Neptunia RPG launches in the west this fall

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Odds & Ends XL: Mega Man: Fully Charged for the fall, Mecard sued, Bushiroad dubs

Breakdown

Mega Man: Full Charged launches this fall
Spin Master brings Mattel to court over Mecard
Monster Hunter film co-produced by Toronto company
Bushiroad Dub News
Quebec City-based studio takes on Neptunia
TV Update
Mind Game in Vancouver
Blog Housekeeping

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DHX looks to sell … something; Wow! Unlimited gets closer to TV screens

Did you know there’s a Peanuts anime?

It’s been a tough fiscal year for DHX Media. The Canadian kids content powerhouse reported revenues of $298.7 million, down from $304.8 million in 2016. More alarmingly, the company went from a net income of $27.7 million to a loss of $3.6 million. Most of the pain came from the fourth quarter, which saw the company lose $18.3 million compared to $1.7 million the year prior. The biggest issue is the company’s ever increasing debt, which was accelerated by their $345-million US purchase of Iconix Brand Group in May, which gives them ownership of the Peanuts and Strawberry Shortcake properties.

DHX primarily attributes their under performance to lower than expected revenue from Teletubbies in the United States, as well as management being preoccupied with the Iconix purchase. But as a publicly traded company, that’s obviously not enough to keep off investors, who helped the company’s share price fall from $6.40 to $5.00. Continue reading

CRTC approves Gintama, World Trigger, more as Canadian content; DHX set to co-produce new Mega Man cartoon

My actual reaction to what you're going to read below.

My actual reaction to what you’re going to read below.

Long time readers of the blog should be aware of the concept of Cancon quotas – a mandate by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) that requires all Canadian television broadcasters to devote a certain percentage of their schedule to locally produced content. It’s a protectionist measure meant to encourage industry and prevent Canada from just being the US, but colder. The quotas have almost certainly benefited the Canadian anime fandom, as simply recording a show’s audio track in Canada qualifies the production as partial Cancon. This gives anime a leg up on other foreign shows. Due to a number of factors, Canadian anime dubs are far less common than they once were. But things might be starting to look up.

To keep broadcasters honest, the CRTC requires programs wishing to count as Canadian content to be sent for approval. As a result of that, the CRTC keeps a publicly accessible database of content that is certified Canadian. This year has seen some interesting anime additions that haven’t aired on Canadian TV. Continue reading

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